May 13th, Molsky’s Mountain Drifters, live in Harrisburg, PA!

Grammy-nominated fiddler Bruce Molsky, who has been acclaimed as “one of America’s premier fiddling talents,” brings his newest musical group, Molsky’s Mountain Drifters, to Harrisburg on Saturday, May 13, 2017, for a Susquehanna Folk Music Society old-time mountain music workshop at 5 p.m., potluck dinner at 6 p.m., and concert at 7:30 p.m., all at the Fort Hunter Centennial Barn, 5300 N. Front Street, Harrisburg. Joining Molsky in the Mountain Drifters are Allison de Groot and Stash Wyslouch.

“I was looking for a new voice,” Molsky says about the trio, “a new avenue of expression using old time mountain music as the jumping off point, but not being constrained by hard core traditionalism. Allison and Stash are showing me the way just where the music is headed, in directions I never would have imagined when I started my own journey into the mountains a long time ago.”

Participants in the free 5 p.m. Old-Time Mountain Music Workshop will learn about the fiddle tunes and songs that come from the rural south. Bring an instrument and your singing voice. There will be some whacky instruments to try such as kazoos, slide whistles, nose flutes, and spoons. For the free 6 p.m. potluck supper, bring a covered dish to share. Drinks and place settings will be provided.

Concert tickets are $24 General Admission, $20 for SFMS members and $10 for students ages 3-22. Advance tickets are available through Brown Paper Tickets online at http://www.brownpapertickets.com or toll-free (800) 838-3006. For more information, visit the Susquehanna Folk Music Society website at www.sfmsfolk.org.

Read below for an exclusive interview with Bruce Molsky

____________________________

FOLKMAMA: I’ve followed your career for a long time and you’ve performed for us a number of times and one of the things that I think about you is that you’re incredibly versatile as a musician. You know in terms of who you play with, all the different instruments you’ve mastered and the different styles that you play. You’ve played for Susquehanna Folk as a solo musician and then you performed with Darol Anger and some years back for a magical concert with Ale Möller. I’d like to hear a little more about the collaborations that you’ve done.

 

BRUCE: I think the first time I was asked to collaborate outside the genre that I’m most associated with, (old-time music) was with Mick Maloney–you know the Irish- American expert. Maloney used to run these big shows every year in Philadelphia and Washington for St Patrick’s Day. He’d always have these amazing Irish American musicians and he always wanted to have me too! You know he knows so much about the music and there is such a strong link between Irish music and Scottish music and so much of the American stuff. At this experience is what really put the idea of doing collaborations in my head.

 

The first time I ever toured professionally as a collaboration was 1994. That was with a tour that really changed my life. It was with a group called Fiddles on Fire and it was in England and Scotland. That was my first introduction to all these other kind of fiddle styles because there were musicians from Sweden and South India, England, Scotland, Ireland and France. That was when I first met Alasdair Fraser, who was on the tour with Kevin Burke, Chris Wood and Ellika Frisell. And it was Alasdair who first started twisting my arm about becoming a professional musician because I was the only one on the tour that had a day job. And one thing led to another.

Since then I’ve done all kinds of crazy stuff. Mosaic was the first serious international band that I was in with Andy Irvine and Dónal Lunny and we’re actually working on putting out a third CD, which has been a long process but now it’s done. And Fiddlers Four with Michael Doucet, Darol Anger and Rashad Eggleston, that was really fun!

I started teaching around 2000 at Mark O’Conner’s fiddle camps. Mark of course would feature a whole bunch of different styles, the camp was meant to be all the different styles that had an influence on him. So there was old-time and Texas Swing, and Celtic music, and classical. And my association with Ale Möller led to the Transatlantic Sessions, which of course are a series live performances by various musicians from both sides of the North Atlantic. I did those concerts for about 10 years; both live and on BBC television in Scotland.

FOLKMAMA: I think one of my favorite You Tube videos of you from the Transatlantic Sessions is a lovely one that shows you performing with Scottish singer Julie Fowlis.

BRUCE: Yes, it’s really beautiful. That gets more views than anything else that I’ve put up on You Tube!

FOLKMAMA: Which brings us to your current group. How did you meet the two other musicians in your trio?

BRUCE: Well here’s how I met Allison de Groot. She was my student at Berkley School of Music. I was the only one that was qualified to teach clawhammer banjo as a main instrument. I ended up with her and she studied with me for three years. About a year and a half in we realized that we needed t be playing together. She’d come to her lessons and we’d study for ten minutes and we’d spend the rest of the time playing. Tony Trishka actually tapped me on the shoulder one day because he is an artist in residence at Berkley and he said, “You really need to be in a band with her.”

So we started thinking about it. Stash was also a Berkley graduate; he had graduated a few years before I got there. But Allison and I had decided that we wanted a guitar player that had deeper musical skills than the average folk musician, and we had Stash in and we played together a few times and the chemistry was there. It’s been a really education for me because I wanted artistically for everyone to be full members in this thing. They both have good ideas and they are brilliant players. Allison is writing some great tunes and Stash is a great singer.

FOLKMAMA: What sound can people expect when they come to your concert?

BRUCE: They are going to hear instrumental and vocal music; fiddle, banjo and guitar. It’s primarily Southern mountain music through all our individual filters with some very nice arrangements. So musical storytelling and dance music; some old, some new.

To learn more about the band visit http://www.brucemolsky.com/molsky-s-mountain-drifters

On April 20th Daisy Castro Quartet plays Fiery Gypsy Jazz in York, PA

The Daisy Castro Quartet will bring fiery Gypsy Jazz music to the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of York on Thursday April 20th at 7:30 pm during a concert sponsored by the Susquehanna Folk Music Society and Songside.com. The venue is located at 925 S. George Street in York

Daisy Castro is an outstanding interpreter of the Gypsy Jazz of the 1930s and 40s (in the style of Django Reinhardt & Stephane Grappelli), and has emerged as a revitalizing force for the genre. At just 20 years old she stuns first-time audience members–continuing to enthrall even those that have seen her perform many times before. Her dynamic playing channels some of the early greats, while adding a modern edge Gypsy Jazz tradition.

Daisy will appear onstage with Quinn Bachand, on lead guitar Max O’Rourke on rhythm guitar, and bassist Greg Loughman. Quinn come from Canada’s West Coast where he performs frequently with his sister Qristina. He has been nominated a total of 16 times for prominent Canadian awards. Max O’Rourke and Greg Loughman play with the popular Gypsy Jazz group Rhythm Future Quartet.

To get a preview of the Daisy Castro Quartet, tune in to Good Day PA! at 12:30 pm on Thursday, April 20th on ABC27 or ABC27.com. The Daisy Castro Quartet will be featured on this “lifestyle” program.

Concert tickets are $20 General Admission, $16 for SFMS members and $10 for students ages 3-22. Advance tickets are available toll-free at (800) 838-3006 or online at http://www.brownpapertickets.com. Funding is provided by the Cultural Enrichment Fund and by the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. For more info visit www.sfmsfolk.org.

We had a chance to talk to Daisy about the music that she plays, how she learned it, and who she is currently playing with.

___

FOLKMAMA: Can you tell us a little about Gypsy Jazz? Where did it start and where is it played now?

DAISY: Gypsy Jazz is a genre that was started in the 1930s in Paris by Django Reinhardt and Stephane Grappelli. It has progressed and changed through the years to become more diverse than just the standards; like Nuages, and Minor Swing, to incorporate more world music. I’ve seen a lot of people putting Balkan influences into it. Sort of taking it back into the Gypsy aspect of it, rather than jazz. That’s kind of where it stands now as I see it; very mixed and very diverse.

FOLKMAMA: Is this World Music sound something that you also incorporate into your playing?

DAISY: Absolutely. Especially lately, I’ve been putting a Middle Eastern influences into what I do. Turkish music–Greek music. Lots of Eastern European type stuff so that goes along with the Balkan thing. I’m really trying to get as many different sounds into the genre as I possibly can.

FOLKMAMA: I’ve noticed that Gypsy Jazz is usually played in a quartet format; with a fiddle, a lead guitar, a rhythm guitar and a bass. Has this introduction of a broader World Music sound altered this standard composition?

DAISY: I haven’t noticed that so much. I know there has been evidence of clarinets and different horns in various bands throughout the years. On my latest album I have involved things such as an oud from Turkey and a bouzouki which is a Greek instrument

FOLKMAMA: What first sparked your interest in Gypsy Jazz?

DAISY: Violin was my first instrument. When I was 5 or 6 I expressed an interest in playing it. My parents got me a really tiny violin and I started taking lesions. I started with classical music initially, but the same year that I started playing I went to France which is where I discovered this kind of music. I didn’t start playing it until probably six years later. But I’ve always had an interest in it.

FOLKMAMA: I understand that you grew up playing in a family band. (The Infidel Castros). What was that experience like?

DAISY: I don’t play with them as much as I used to because I’m not it the area very much, but growing up I used to play a lot with them. We had a very diverse repertoire; lots of jazz standards. My dad would play some Gypsy Jazz stuff with me. Really a wide variety of things like singer/songwriter, folk music, even some classically inspired pieces.

FOLKMAMA: Since you started out playing classical music, I’m curious how you took the leap to being a jazz improv player. Was it difficult?

DAISY: I was vaguely afraid of improvisation for the first few years, but I think that was just a mental blockade on my part. It wasn’t something that technically would have been an issue if I hadn’t been sort of putting up a wall and making it more difficult for myself. But I know it’s very difficult to get off the page—especially the longer that you’ve stayed with classical music. But I do know many classical musicians who are excellent improvisers as well. So it really depends on the person and the attitude towards it I suppose.

FOLKMAMA: What are some of the experiences that you’ve had that have really pushed your music forward? s

DAISY: The most recent thing that has really influenced me is going to Brussels to study with a violinist named Tcha Limberger. I basically lived with him for a month and learned his perspective on music of all genres. We played lots of Greek and Romanian tunes together. I was really able to concentrate on improving my sound and improving my ear. Also touring with people such as Gonzallo Bergara. This has taken me to many places in North America and Canada. This year I’m going to be going to Russia with him and Panama.

FOLKMAMA: Tell about members of the group. Who are they, how does you know them?

DAISY: I have met these people in various places. Max O’Rourke, one of the guitar players, he also plays with Gonzallo and that’s really how I got to know him. And two out of the three of them were on the latest album. I met Quinn at a festival on Widbey Island in Washington State and I played with him a little bit and we stayed in touch. And Greg Loughman is a bass player for a band called RHYTHM FUTURE which is based out of New England and Max is also in that band. So they are really from everywhere.

This time we’re planning on getting together and having a day for rehearsal, basically playing as much as we can. Because they are not all in one location, it can get difficult for rehearsals but we have a lot of trust in each other and they are really good.

FOLKMAMA: What is concert going to be like?

DAISY: I think the audience can expect sounds from various places in the world and a mix of Gypsy Jazz standards and more world music type stuff. There is really not much that you can try to expect to be definitely happening because it is quite spontaneous sometime. But I think it’s a very unique sound. I think that’s its worldly and interesting.

FOLKMAMA: From looking at your You Tubes, I think people ought to realize how virtuosic all of your playing is. I’d like to say to the public, “If you are a guitar player…you ought to be there. You ought to come see those fingers flying if you are a violinist.”

DAISY: Our music can get very fiery! At the same time there are a lot of very slow pieces that take a lot of time to convey a soulful feeling.

FOLKMAMA: It’s says in your bio that the Gypsy jazz world is very male dominated. I’m curious if you’ve run across barriers, perhaps put up because of your gender or even your age.

DAISY: I have never felt anything in this community other than respect. I think it’s a very respectful community. I think there are a lot of people that come together to play this music that really have an appreciation of each other and what they are doing to keep the genre alive, which is from the past and has the potential to die out.

FOLKMAMA: Penetrating the Gypsy jazz world at such a young age must have meant that you have very supportive parents. What has their role been? What has it been like growing up with music as such a strong focus?

DAISY: My parents have always been extremely supportive of what I have been pursuing in my life. They’ve always helped me a lot along the way while still allowing me a lot of room for me to figure out my own way. . Music has been really the biggest influence on all areas of my life such as friendships, traveling and experiences that I have. I’d say that a huge portion of those experiences and things that I have gone through are because of music or related to music.

FOLKMAMA: Are you also a composer, or mainly an interpreter?

DAISY: I’m trying more and more to compose more pieces. Up until the past two years it’s largely been covering other people’s music and expressing it in the way that I would express it, but one of my goals for the very near future is to compose more of my own stuff, and I think I’m growing closer to that.