Interview with Jesse Periard of Ten Strings and a Goat Skin, Performing September 24th in York, PA

Ten Strings and a Goat Skin, a Celtic folk trio from Canada’s Prince Edward Island, comes to the area for a Susquehanna Folk Music Society concert at 7:30 p.m. on Sunday, September 24, 2017 at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of York, 925 S. George Street, York, PA.

Expanding on the Scottish and Acadian roots of PEI’s traditional music, Ten Strings and a Goat Skin weave old-school Franco-Canadian, Breton, Irish, and Scottish tunes with wickedly current grooves and clear quirks, flirting with indie’s best moments.

Concert tickets are $24 General Admission, $20 for SFMS members and $10 for students ages 3-22. Advance tickets are available through Brown Paper Tickets online HERE or toll-free (800) 838-3006. For more information, visit the Susquehanna Folk Music Society website.

Ten Strings Official Photo 03 (1)

SFMS Staff Writer Peter Winter had a chance to chat via email with TSGS Guitarist Jesse Periard.

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How long have the three of you been playing together and how did the band start?

Rowen and Caleb are brothers, so they have been playing music together for a long time now. I met the boys when I was in the 6th grade, and we started playing music together a couple years after that. We’ve now been playing together for 10 years.

 What different elements make up the traditional Prince Edward Island sound that you draw from?

We take a lot of our inspiration from the Acadian culture that comes from PEI. Very playful and energetic music. But other traditional styles play a huge part in  PEIs sound, including Scottish and Irish, which we also love to play.

Auprès du Poêle (1)

 The title for your 2016 sophomore record  “Aupres du Poele” translates to “Around the Woodstove.”  Could you speak a bit about the significance of that title and how it came about?

We recorded our latest album in Joliette, Québec, during the months of October and December of 2015. We started our days very early in the morning, and always finished very late at night, and it was always cold. So we always looked forward to coming back to our friends house. She hosted us and always had a wood stove burning for us when we got home. We would eat, drink, and even rehearse in the same room as the wood stove. A lot of times we had people over and we all told stories and played music and joked around. It was very inspiring and seemed a very appropriate theme for the album. The wood stove to us, is a representation of community and people banding together during hard times, such as winter.

How do you think Ten Strings and a Goat Skin developed as a band from your first record to your second record?

Between our first and our latest record, there’s been a lot that’s happened. The three of us have each grown as people and as musicians. Caleb studied music business in college, and I studied contemporary music, and we’ve been able to apply our knowledge to the group and develop our music and business. Along with all of our travelling, we’ve been exposed to so many different styles of traditional music, as well as some amazing players, and we’ve learnt a lot from these different experiences and that has all definitely made an impact on our compositions and writing styles.

Tradition is often described as “Remembered Innovation.” Ten Strings and a Goat Skin has connections to both the trad and indie folk scenes of PEI.  Where do you feel the group fits in between these two worlds?

We definitely consider ourselves more on the trad side. A lot of trad bands these days play with a lot of pop and indie influences, but still fall under the trad category. I think that’s because along with our instrumentation, the tune structures are still very rooted in traditional music.

What Musicians have been sources of inspiration to all of you?

We could make you an entire book with the bands and people who’ve played a major role in our lives as musicians. To name a few in the traditional world, we love bands like Flook, Lau, The Olllam, Les Poules à Colin, The East Pointers, and Vishtèn to name a few. But we also take inspiration from bands like Bon Iver, Chance The Rapper, Vulfpeck, and other bands that don’t fall into the traditional category at all.

What do you want an audience to take away from a TSGS show?

Our goal during our live shows is to simply make people happy for a night. If people can go home a bit happier after our show, we feel like we’ve done our jobs.

 

——Nerdy Guitar Quesions——-

What tuning do you prefer and why?

I mainly play in Drop D tuning. It’s a lot of fun and allows for some open, but still jazzy voicings. I also really enjoy playing in DADGAD.

What are some good things to remember when backing up tunes?

My biggest thing in terms of backing tunes is making sure your rhythm is on. You could be making the nicest coolest tastiest chords, but if you’re not on the beat, those chords are pointless.
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Peter Winter is a musician and writer from Harrisburg, PA.  He plays in the Celtic band Seasons and blogs about music at All The Day Sounds
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